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Saturday, March 9, 2013

Day 320: Where Does Our Food Come From?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2290191/Police-protection-Peasenhall-Primary-School-animal-rights-group-launches-hate-campaign.html



A headmistress has called in police after an animal rights group launched a 'vile' world-wide campaign against her village school where youngsters are rearing three piglets.
Since news of the project emerged, staff say they have been threatened by animal rights campaigners who vowed to demonstrate outside the school and bombarded the headmistress with hundreds of emails.
The 25 pupils at Peasenhall Primary School, near Saxmundham in Suffolk, helped to build a pen and eco-friendly ark for the three Berkshire-Old Spot Gloucester cross piglets, who arrived from a local smallholding a week ago.
But since then the school has been targeted by opponents including an online petition which has already attracted more than 4,600 signatures from around the world, including comments from Chile, Japan, the USA and Israel.
The petition claims that the piglets are to be named Ham, Bacon and Pork, but staff at the school said this was untrue and the animals have deliberately not been named.
Headmistress Kath Cook said today: 'It has been horrendous - we are being bombarded by nasty, vile calls and e-mail messages from all over the world - even America and Australia.
'Some of them are very threatening - things like I should be taken to a slaughterhouse.
'We are getting images of animals being killed or kept in cages - it is horrible.
'We are just trying to shield the children from it all but they have even threatened to demonstrate outside the school. It has become so bad that we have called in the police because this is sheer harassment.'
The trouble began when a local BBC reporter covered the story about the children, aged between five to 11 years old, and their tiny herd of pigs last week .
A spokeswoman for the Colchester Animal Defenders, calling herself Liza Isa-Vegan, said: 'Children should not be exposed to this sort of thing - these pigs will be slaughtered and eaten and no animal should be used as food.
'There is no such thing as healthy meat. The children should not be taught that meat is necessary or that pigs are lesser beings than humans.
'Not only are they teaching bad health - one in three 11-year-olds will be obese by 2015 - but it is desensitizing children in the process. - DailyMail


What is more important: profit or life?

What is more important: money or morality?

What is more important: our ability to survive or our conscience?

As long as money rules our ability to survive; life, morality and our consciences will take the back seat. As long as we teach our children that competing against each other for rewards of money and attention is all there is to life, then that is all there will be to life. As long as money is worth more than life, veganism or vegetarianism will never work.

As long as there is opportunity to profit from meat in some way then there will be a meat industry. Trying to change the world through veganism is the same as trying to stop a ten ton boulder from rolling off a cliff by throwing a few potatoes at it. Stopping the abuse of animals because of the meat industry will have to be done by stopping the actual cause for the meat industry existing: money.

Protesting and activism and rights protection groups have become aggressive, trying to impose an ideology onto a system that just doesn't care. Obviously, upon seeing the indifference to the suffering of others, the activists, protestors and right protection groups push harder, shout louder, demand more - they're basically bashing their heads against the wall - but for what? To try and force something onto a system and society that simply is not interested? Money is too important. Money is too precious to give up.

When presented with a choice: money or doing the right thing - 99% of us will choose money. We all have a price, a number that moots our protesting inner voice.

So, should we teach our kids where their food comes from, or should we continue "protecting" them from "the harsh realities of life"?

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